Is There a Doctor in the Boss?

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Mara couldn’t believe what she was hearing.  She knew her boss, Doreen, to be a braggart.  She knew her to be a slave driver who equated how much work she did with her worth as a person.  She also knew her as a terrible manager.  However, sitting in front of her, Doreen was claiming to be a doctor.

It had started several weeks ago when Mara came home from the doctor with a confirmation to a diagnosis.  To keep this blog relevant, let’s say Mara was diagnosed with the dreaded Disease X.  It wasn’t fatal, but was chronic.  It could cause some terrible symptoms to manifest, and needed monitoring and treatment.  At times, it would not make coming into the office easy, but Mara thought, at those times, she could manage working from home.  She would have to see.

In accordance with the company’s policies, Mara was to tell her manager, who would then report this to Human Resources.  Mara would supply a doctor’s note affirming the diagnosis.  Human Resources would then work with Mara for a reasonable accommodation, which Mara hoped would be that when she needed to work from home, she could.  She didn’t intend to abuse this policy, but wanted it available to her if needed.

That morning, Mara made time on Doreen’s calendar to speak with her.  She laid out the doctor’s diagnosis of Disease X, produced the note, and asked they be forwarded to Human Resources.

Doreen looked at Mara, looked at the note, and rejected them both.  Her words, verbatim, were, “You don’t have Disease X.”  With that, she dismissed Mara, refusing to accept any evidence that Mara was chronically ill.  With that, she also rejected any notion that Mara could have a reasonable accommodation or be able to work from home a bit extra to take care of the condition.  She congratulated herself on solving the problem so easily.

Mara sat there stunned.  This was a medical diagnosis.  There were established procedures for this within the company.  She had proof — more than that doctor’s note, she had all her tests, which indicated she had Disease X.  In one short sentence, Doreen had circumvented the whole process in the name of convenience – for Doreen.

Mara had to go out of procedure herself and went to HR to self-report her medical condition.  When asked why she didn’t go to her supervisor, she reported what happened, to the stunned silence of the HR representative.  They all knew Doreen to be less than a stellar manager, but never would believe that even she would do this.

In the end, Mara went on record with her diagnosis of Disease X, worked with HR for a reasonable accommodation, and made an enemy of Doreen.  Doreen loved her control, and for Mara to go around her to report her illness was, in Doreen’s mind, nothing less than insubordination.  From that point on, she did everything in her power to make Mara’s life more difficult.

There are few things more precious than someone’s health.  It’s not like you can go order another one online.  Even if you and your employees are not going to ever be considered friends, you have a duty to perform in helping protect that person’s health, if for no other reason than you would have one less person to do the work that makes you look good.

No manager is above the company’s procedure, and, especially when it is a life or death matter, no manager has the right to make a decision in which they have no knowledge or background.  Want to be a doctor?  Go to school and become a doctor.  Your employees would probably be happy that they get a new manager — one who may recognize their employees health over the manager’s ego.

 

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